Complete Skin Care For All Ages

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

We also have a blog that will be updated regularly with topics on medical skin conditions and aethetic services.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

General Dermatology Websites

http://www.aad.org/skin-conditions/dermatology-a-to-z

http://emedicine.medscape.com/dermatology

Websites for Patient Education by topic

Acne

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/acnenet/index.html

Actinic Keratosis

http://www.aad.org/skin-conditions/dermatology-a-to-z/actinic-keratosis

http://www.skincancerguide.ca/lesions/index.html

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/actinickeratosesnet/index.html

Aging Sking

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/agingskinnet/index.html

Albinism

http://www.albinism.org/ (National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation)

Alopecia Areata

http://www.naaf.org/

Androgenic Alopecia

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1070167-overview

Atopic Dermatitis/Eczema

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/eczemanet/index.html

http://www.nationaleczema.org/

http://eczema.org/

Bechet Disease

http://www.behcets.com/site/pp.asp?c=bhJIJSOCJrHHYPERLINK

Birthmarks

http://www.birthmarks.com/Index.cfm

http://www.faces-cranio.org/Disord/Vascular.htm

Bullous Pemphigoid

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1062391-overview

Contact Dermatitis

http://www.contactderm.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1

Congenital Moles

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/skincancernet/moles_children.html

Dermatitis Herpetiformis

http://www.gluten.net/

http://www.csaceliacs.org/dh_defined.php

Herpes

http://herpes.org/

Hyperhidrosis

http://sweathelp.org/

http://miradry.org/

Icthyosis and related disorders

http://www.firstskinfoundation.org/

Leprosy

http://www.who.int/lep/en/

Lupus

http://www.lupus.org/newsite/index.html

Melanoma

http://www.melanoma.org/

http://aimatmelanoma.org/

http://melanoma.com/

Neurofibromatosis

http://www.ctf.org/

http://www.nfnetwork.org/

Pediatric Dermatology

http://www.pedsderm.net/

Porphyria

http://www.porphyriafoundation.com/

Psoriasis

http://www.psoriasis.org/

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/psoriasisnet/index.html

https://www.psoriasis-association.org.uk/

Rosacea

http://rosacea.org/

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/psoriasisnet/index.html

Skin Cancer

http://skincancer.org

http://www.cancer.gov/

http://www.skincarephysicians.com/skincancernet/index.html

Vitiligo

http://www.mynvfi.org/

Hives are characterized as itchy red, raised welts (also known as wheals) on the skin's surface that can spread or join together and form larger areas of raised lesions. They are generally triggered by exposure to an allergen or chemical irritant. They tend to appear suddenly and often disappear equally as suddenly.

Hives are usually an allergic reaction to food, medicine or animals. They can also be triggered by sun exposure, stress, excessive perspiration or other, more serious diseases, such as lupus. Anyone can get hives. They are harmless and non-contagious. Hives may itch, burn or sting. They rarely need medical attention as they tend to disappear on their own. However, in persistent cases, your dermatologist may prescribe antihistamines or oral corticosteroids. The best way to prevent hives is to discontinue exposure to the allergic irritant.

Hives lasting more than six weeks are known as chronic urticaria or, if there is swelling below the surface of the skin, angioedema. There are no known causes of angioedema, but it can affect internal organs and therefore requires medical attention.